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Aug. 5, 2022

How To Use Social Media To Improve Customer Experiences [Stacy Sherman Interview]

How To Use Social Media To Improve Customer Experiences [Stacy Sherman Interview]

I always talk about how social media can and should be used by businesses for more than just mere "promotion" or advertisement - there's nothing social about an ad, even if it is appearing on a feed in a social network.

While I tend to talk about social media as being a place to collaborate with influencers, it is equally a critical arena that gives you the ability to deepen relationships with your own customers.

Customer experience marketing expert Stacy Sherman joins me for this interview where she goes into the different ways brands can leverage social media to deepen customer relationships.

Key Highlights

[02:56] Introduction of Podcast Guest, Stacy Sherman

[06:53] Stacy's Journey to Customer Experience

[10:47] Stacy's Advise to Companies That Are Ready to Leverage Customer Experience

[12:54] How to Start Customer Experience Audit

[15:46] It's All About Response

[18:11] The Power of Connection

[24:15] Recommended Tools for Competitive Research

[34:08] Connect with Stacy

Notable Quotes

  • You have to validate what you're doing, what you've designed, does it really meet their needs? And then you fix those gaps, or pain points, sometimes those arise. 
  • Response time is essential, because people are watching, and noticing how fast you solve their problem or offer help, even if it's to take it offline. People are watching and so they create a perception of you as a company based on that.
  • That's what customer experience is. It's a feeling that you get that makes you keep coming back.
  • Use social media very carefully for influencing decisions and influencing thought leadership, not selling.
  • I see more companies actually leaning into their staff to have a voice and using it as a way to empower them to advocate for the brand in an authentic way but not selling. It's, it's coming across with sincerity those that are doing it right. And I think it is a powerful marketing tool, and a way to also increase engagement organically.
  • I encourage people to play around, figure out your voice. And keep in mind what we're talking about here, don't come at it as bragging, come at it as take content, you see others talking about and repurpose it reshard with your own commentary. That's, that's influential, that's leadership.
  •  Make sure you're using social media to actually get the voice of I guess its customers, prospects, your audience.

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Transcript

Neal Schaffer:

Social media is not just about promotion. It is about connection. And I talk about in the age of influence the many ways to use social media together with influencers to connect with your customers to connect with your employees. What about leveraging social media to improve the customer experience? That is going to be the topic on today's episode of The your digital marketing coach podcast. Digital social media content, influencer marketing, blogging, podcasting, blogging, tick talking LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, SEO, SEM, PPC, email marketing, who there's a lot to cover, whether you're a marketing professional entrepreneur, or business owner, you need someone you can rely on for expert advice. Good thing you've got, Neil, on your side, because Neal Schaffer is your digital digital marketing marketing coach, helping you grow your business with digital first marketing one episode at a time. This is your digital marketing coach, and this is Neal Schaffer. Hey, everybody, Neal Schaffer here. Welcome to my podcast. And I am your digital marketing coach. Therefore, that is the name of the podcast. If you're new here, welcome. I provide actionable advice, and hopefully insightful all about leveraging digital marketing as your growth engine. And when we talk about digital marketing, I have a very holistic perspective of it. It covers everything from content marketing, influencer marketing, social media marketing, to more traditional digital marketing, such as well SEO, email marketing, and that boring old school stuff, which I actually find really exciting. And I think there's plenty of untapped potential for all of you listening. If you are regular here, hey, I really try to stay consistent to a weekly schedule. But sometimes life gets in the way. So if you remember my most previous episode, I talked about my Midwest trip, I'm still playing catch up. And to be honest with you, I was busy after that preparing to teach. Well, when you hear this, I would have already announced on LinkedIn. But I've accepted a new opportunity to teach a class dedicated to influencer marketing at UCLA Extension here in Los Angeles, California. So I'm really excited to be affiliated with UCLA and to create a course really for my book of well educating and mentoring the next generation of influencer marketers and marketers of how to do influencer marketing, right. So I'm looking forward to bringing that to other universities content. If there anyone that has any connections, universities listening, I'd love for any interest you might have. But hey, today's about the customer experience. It's not about me and my teaching. And today is an interview podcast. For those of you that are new, I do go a solo episode and then an interview because there are so many amazing experts in my network. And today is one of them. Stacy Sherman. Now, in the past, I had a gentleman named Dan Guinness on and for those of you that don't know, he was on episode number 138. And we talked about customer experience marketing, why you must embrace it to stand out as a business. So that would be sort of like the prequel to this episode. I published that way back in March 14 2019. I will say we've talked about customer experience a little bit. I talk about obviously leveraging your customers as part of your influencer marketing. When I interviewed the great David Meerman. Scott, back in January of 2020, episode number 143. We talked about his book that he co authored with his daughter fan, ah cracy we sort of hinted at this. And obviously on other episodes, it is something that we have beat around the bush about but this is going to be the first episode since Dan's interview to really go wholeheartedly into customer experience marketing for what it is now. STACEY And Dan are two of the foremost experts on customer experience marketing, which is why I'm really excited to add Stacy to the list of people that I've interviewed. She has her own podcast, which you'll hear about called doing CX right CX obviously being how we talk about customer experience, but she is one of these veteran corporate marketers. She was a manager for global sales and marketing AT and T she was let's see here, Senior Manager digital marketing, Wilton brands, had experience doing customer experience at Verizon that she's going to talk about, she has been head of customer experience and employee engagement for Schindler elevator. She is currently Vice President of Marketing agent experience a ex that was a new one and customer experience at live up so she brings a lot of real Solid corporate experience, but also, she is one of the nicest, most genuine and intelligent people that you will meet out there in digital marketing. So hey, without further ado, I'll let you be the judge of that I'm sure you're gonna agree to me. So here's my interview with Stacy Sherman, talking all about how to use social media to improve customer experiences, and why that's important. You're listening to your digital marketing coach, this is Neal Schaffer. Stacey Sherman, welcome to the your digital marketing coach podcast.

Stacy Sherman:

Thank you. So glad to be here.

Neal Schaffer:

I have not had a New York and accent on this podcast for a while. So it's always good to hear I met many relatives in New York from our parents met and grew up. And obviously, you know, teaching wreckers always love to hear that East Coast accent. So you are out of New York City, correct.

Stacy Sherman:

I'm in New Jersey, but it's relatively close by and it's the Garden State, but it definitely gets a bad rap.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I was gonna say everybody from New Jersey likes to say their cluster Bay right now. I love New Jersey. Many great memories there. And yeah, great people. So All righty. Well, this is not a podcast about the United States geography and slang and accents. So Stacy, you are considered one of the top experts in customer experience and customer experience marketing. Now, my audience we've had Dan Gillis, who I know is a mutual friend of ours on the podcast before to talk a little bit about customer experience. That was some time ago. And I think with COVID, things might be a little bit different now in terms of how we talk about customer experience and its importance. But before we get there, you know, when we grew up, we weren't talking about the term didn't even exist. So I'm sort of curious what brought you into doing what you're doing now.

Stacy Sherman:

Doing CX right. Yes, we are about doing not just talking and to what you're speaking about customer service has been around for a very long time. And I want to say very clearly customer service is not customer experience, it is one component of customer experience. And so the whole process and framework around customer experience is a much larger component of how people experience brands, how they interact with brands, from the moment they become aware and learn, which is a lot of marketing, to buying experiences in E commerce. So think about retail, ecommerce has multiple ways to buy. And so if you go through an A journey of of learn by get use, pay, and get help get help as customer service as we know it. There's a whole experience. And you have to look at it in totality, but also those micro moments.

Neal Schaffer:

But this let me ask you personally, how you got involved in because the customer experiences is relatively new. And just from a career perspective, what brought you to what you do today?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, I literally fell into it. And what I mean by that is I grew up always with sales and marketing as my background. And I was at Verizon around 2013. And my boss said to me, Hey, there's this customer experience CX thing. It's booming. It's hot, and like, well, what is that? And they said, You know, I don't really know, but go figure it out. And so I did, and it has evolved tremendously. So there's components of figuring it out, meaning there's listening to customer feedback. And responding to feedback, which provides an experience and very much connected to social media to there is infusing the customer feedback where new products are developed. And so I moved around in companies where it was e commerce and optimizing the E commerce experience to make sure that people come and can do what they need to do buy learn. But then new product development bring prospects in those personas that are your target audience to the table and asking them do you see value in this product or service? Would you be willing to buy it yes or no? Why or why not? So it's so important this whole concept because otherwise you're building something throwing it out into the market and hoping it sticks and you're not asking the real user ahead of time doesn't work.

Neal Schaffer:

Gotcha and, and props to Verizon because they've always been very savvy and innovative in a lot of what they do in marketing and influencer marketing. I've met a lot of their employees that right Tucker is actually teaching as part of the social media, mini Social Media Marketing mini MBA program. So, so yeah, 2013 That was really early. So you've been doing this nearly a decade. So let's get started with, you know, for large enterprises totally get it. And the ROI of retaining a customer, rather than acquiring a new one is huge. So the ROI of CX I can imagine that's part of the equation. I'm just curious for some of our listeners, who are smaller business owners. And I'm assuming you're such an evangelist, you would say, even if you're a solopreneur, that there's a way to leverage CX, but I'm curious, what would be your advice, as you know, when a company is ready to leverage customer experience to to leverage these concepts as part of doing business? Or is it for every business all the time,

Stacy Sherman:

it's for every business all the time, because even your local, even your local Starbucks store, or your local cafe, you know that you're paying triple the price for a cup of coffee that you can get at other places? Maybe McDonald's? I don't know. I haven't bought coffee there lately, but it was 99 cents not long ago.

Neal Schaffer:

Gotta get the senior coffee. They don't ask for your age. But I learned very on that's the 99 cent coffee now.

Stacy Sherman:

All right, well, so but I don't go there I go, because I'm going to my local pops mom and pop shop. Because when I walk in, they say hello. I mean, I joined the basics right there saying hello in in, in more technical terms, I'm getting on boarded into the experience. So there's things that any company when they have any customer of any segment of any age of any demographic, it's about people. So Are you welcoming people? Are you when there's a mistake that happens? Do you correct it? Or do you make excuses? If you have an app? Is it easy to actually order my cup of coffee? Or is it so complicated? I get frustrated, I don't even order it, I don't even go there are these things that you have to do? Right? And you have to do intentionally? And you have to measure? Is the customer really happy? The way you think they are? And that's part of customer experience and doing it right.

Neal Schaffer:

So for a larger enterprise, they might have dedicated people that do this, I'm assuming for the smaller business, it's less about a dedicated person or more about infusing CX in everything they do. And Dan had brought up this concept of a CX audit customer experience audit, which probably uncovered is that for the smallest business, is that something you would like on a quarterly basis, you should tap into a CX expert, and just make sure that everything is aligned, and you're putting your best foot forward? Is that? Is that what you would recommend at the very, very small scale?

Stacy Sherman:

I would, I would also start with very basic a whiteboard, to literally lay out design the customer journey. How does your customer or your target customer learn about you? Design? What is that? And how are they going to buy from you? Is it only they need to come into your local shop? Or is it a phone call? Or is there a salesperson that's out there? Like how do they interact and get your brand and enjoy it and use it and get help? And when you design it, then where the magic happens is you ask real customers? Hey, is this what you expected? Do you so if I'm investing just in paid search, for example. And your target audience then actually tells you now I really only read these certain publications for the technology or for the product you offer, then you don't belong on paid search. That's not where they're looking for you. So you have to validate what you're doing, what you've designed, does it really meet their needs? And then you fix those gaps, or pain points, sometimes those arise. And so yeah, you whiteboard. And back to the question. I will tell you, everybody in the company, small or large has a CX job. I've I remember, I was talking to the billing team. And they said, I don't have a CX job. In fact, I don't even talk to the customer. We have an E pay portal and don't really get involved. I said, Oh, yeah, you do. Because if they get stuck paying their bill, or they can't get help, guess what? It doesn't matter. The buying from you were so easy and they got their product so quickly. They're frustrated that this is a pain point. They're going to leave they may not even tell you. So yes,

Neal Schaffer:

yeah, I remember growing up. They say every every one of my companies a salesperson. So it's a similar concept but towards CX So one of the things that we're going to talk about today is I think we all understand, intrinsically, intuitively that having a positive customer experience can only help our business in many, many ways. In order to get there, maybe not so easy, maybe we're not doing as good as we think we need to be doing, we need to be more in tune with that buyers journey with our consumer. But one of the things you were talking about before we hit the record button is the various ways in which companies can use social media to help improve upon that customer experience, I wanted to dig a little bit deeper into that, because I know my audience are very active in social media and in leveraging the latest social media marketing strategies. So you know, what would you begin to tell companies that are managing social media about how they can use it to improve the customer experience?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, I love this topic. So first of all, people are commenting on social media, about your brand. Oftentimes, they can do it publicly, on on their wall, or they'll send you a private message. Obviously, if it's private, it's going to have different ramifications in the world seeing a complaint. So now, either way, I caution, that response time is essential, because people are watching, and noticing how fast you solve their problem or offer help, even if it's to take it offline. People are watching and so they create a perception of you as a company based on that. So response time, and also what you say, do not start a debate that somebody's wrong, or, or whatever. I mean, just don't do that on social media as a brand.

Neal Schaffer:

Right? Right. Or the customer's always right, is really the approach, right?

Stacy Sherman:

Take it offline, take it to the back room. Just people are watching. They're watching what you say. And they're watching what you don't say.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, and I think I think from the customer service, approach, that that's really valuable, I think, even from following someone back, and then thanking you like, Oh, my God, I can't believe you follow me back. Or I had a Grammy Award winning musician was one of my clients early on in my career. And he actually used a automated Twitter direct message to thank people for following him. But his fans, like, I can't believe like you're sending me a direct message. Right? So just even acknowledging even you know, I talked about I think I talked about on your podcast, and we'll want to do so at the very end of when I posted my wife and I love this mini Sangria flight that California Pizza Kitchen has. And when I posted it, you know, California Pizza Kitchen liked it. And I know when I went through my notifications, oh my gosh, California Pizza Kitchen like this, right? It's little things like that, even if they're not customer service, like proactively about, you know, inserting yourself into relationships that can have so much impact, right?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, you're talking about connection. When a brand likes what you put out there, especially if you tagged them. The fact that they're watching the fact that they acknowledge you, you feel like they care. It's a perception whether they do or don't. It's a perception and a feeling that heck knows. Right. Right. But that's what customer experience is. It's a feeling that you get that makes you keep coming back.

Neal Schaffer:

And I'll tell people, I don't know why. But I have this LinkedIn setting. This is for my own personal brand. i This LinkedIn setting where I wasn't being notified if I was being tagged and post it. Someone said, Oh, I I tagged you in the post? Did you see it? I'm like, No, I didn't see it. And I had the setting. I don't know why, but I wasn't getting the tags. But now that I'm getting the tags, when people share my content, and they tagged me, I'm I'm liking the post, I'm thanking them. It helps the post be seen in the algorithm. It's also people are like, Well, you didn't have to do that. And you're like, I'm so honored that you came by to think you know what I mean? So it's that same thing, make sure that you're you're seeing the tags, and you're paying attention and you're responding not just if it's a customer service issue, but that that engagement, that connection,

Stacy Sherman:

correct. And here's another tip. You also can follow your competitors, and watch what they're responding. Watch what they're saying. And if you see a customer's irate, and it's visible, you have an opportunity to develop a relationship. It's not hard.

Neal Schaffer:

Absolutely. All right. So tip number one was all about response. Well really just acknowledge, in a broad sense. What other tips do you have for our listeners today?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, so in addition to competitive insights, I would tell you that use social media very carefully for influencing decisions and influencing thought leadership, not selling. I immediately when I get a connection request, and I know right away, they're trying to sell me something, I actually stopped responding here, I'm telling you, make sure you respond. But I actually do the opposite when it comes to a personal message, and the first thing they're doing is selling me something. Like I just lost all patience. Don't do that.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, that's not that's not a positive customer experiences. And I think, you know, it states this, this leads to a very, very broad discussion about social media and its role in marketing. And I guess in its role in customer experience, and I guess, it probably today has a bigger role in customer experience than does in marketing. Because if you're looking to generate website traffic, from social media, those days are, I'm sorry, they're long gone, that that's not a place to do it, it's really a place to engage and make that connection, I think we're getting back to when social media started, and businesses are trying to figure it out. It was PR, they're using a social listening tool called radian six. And it really started out as a PR function, I sort of feel like we're going back to those days, it's about the relationships, that connections with influencers and abroad, prospective employees, customers, and, you know, thought leaders and, and content creators. But have you have you seen a similar shift in social media, from your perspective? And then how do you think that's impacted the importance of customer experience?

Stacy Sherman:

I do I see the shift. I see more companies actually leaning into their staff to have a voice and using it as a way to empower them to advocate for the brand in an authentic way but not selling. It's, it's coming across with sincerity those that are doing it right. And I think it is a powerful marketing tool, and a way to also increase engagement organically.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I think it's the concept of let other people sell for you. And you're in charge your branding, you're in charge of helping people educating those are all great things you can do which add value. But let let the others create a program. You know, I call it an influencer program could be a brand ambassador program. It's all inclusive, include employees, customers, but everybody to be to be talking about your brand without you having to do it is the least salesy way of having a social media presence, right?

Stacy Sherman:

It is, and people are afraid of some of the platforms. If they haven't used it, it they feel like it's intimidating. But it is. Yeah, exactly. I mean, it's not hard, you really can watch a few YouTube videos and really see, it's, it's easy, and I encourage people to play around, figure out your voice. And keep in mind what we're talking about here, don't come at it as bragging, come at it as take content, you see others talking about and repurpose it reshard with your own commentary. That's, that's influential, that's leadership.

Neal Schaffer:

Right. And it's also acknowledging others as part of that. And and I love, you know, you only touched on it briefly, but this notion of competitive intelligence, so I'm actually going to be speaking at Content Marketing World for the first time this year, on how to re engineer your competitors, social media marketing strategy. And there is so much you can learn from public information, I call it standing on the shoulders of giants. And instead of trying to figure out yourself, look at what companies that are bigger than you that have invested more resources, look at what they're doing. And that's going to be really insightful, because they've already invested all the money in it, right? And you can leverage that information to make things better, not just with your own marketing, but with your own CX and everything else you do. So for those business owners listening and entrepreneurs, are there tools that you recommend to do that? Or can it start with just hashtag searches? Going on your competitors feeds and what have you, how do you how did you just getting started and in leveraging social for competitive research?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, there are certainly tools. Were vendor agnostic here. But with that said, you can look at I mean, if you're a big Twitter user, you HootSuite and TweetDeck had been around and I create a tag for them or folder so that competitors are in that bucket that when I want to when I'm thinking about that maybe dedicate a day or every Wednesday morning, this is competitive intelligence time, and you go to that section, and you look at that feed specifically to your competitors.

Neal Schaffer:

So and it could be as simple as a Twitter list. If a private Twitter list what If you're on Twitter, other platforms, it's not so easy to do that. But yeah, that's great advice, I am going to give props. I'm also vendor agnostic. But this presentation is based on client work that I did. And I did research on what is the best tool to enable you to do this. And the tool that I found that was by far the best. And, you know, I've virtually met the founders, what have you, is a tool called Social insider.io. And if you want to do really, really deep social media analytics, I'm going to have to have the founder on this show, at some point throughout Romania, just great people, but really, really great technology. And my client was blown away with the work. So you'll have to meet me a Content Marketing World to find out more about how to leverage it to like that, and how to make it actionable. Because I always say it's not about the tool I, I just interviewed Stacy, someone yesterday for this podcast, it'll already be published, Hillary and grow, we talked about keyword research and SEO. And the tool does not tell you what keywords to target, the tool will give you search volumes. But at the end of the day, you have to using an analogue mindset, be able to critically interpret the search intent of when someone types in a keyword, what are they searching for? And then how does it align with your products and services? So it's not just the tool, it's how you leverage that information that I think is more important.

Stacy Sherman:

Yes. And back to what we were talking about earlier, and our fun tips and tricks of staying organized. At the end of the day, there's

Neal Schaffer:

a button we should have. But anyway, yeah, it was a very fun

Stacy Sherman:

conversation. At the end of the day, where we landed, is the tool, the platform that is so intuitive and easy to use. So the same was social media listening and, and platforms, whoever is easy, intuitive, and you could basically open up and login and start using it is the one that's gonna win. And that's UX. That's CX two.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, and I'll go beyond but and by the way, we I hadn't I haven't been asked about my productivity, sort of, I won't say like guru tips, because I'm not a productivity guru by any means. But I use a combination of Google Calendar to organize, you know, daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly annual tasks together with notion. And then I use posting post it notes for live conversations. And but I ended up putting all that notion. So if you are curious, that's what we're talking about. But anyway, so the whole thing about social media for, you know, understanding your competitor and tool. So it can be as easy as, you know, doing a search where your competitors, what are people saying about them, you know, at mentions, it can be a hashtag search, but I'll say that, that same Intel is really critical. You're talking about new platforms, where people are very timid, I am still very late to the Tick Tock game. And I always have these grandiose plans to be to be doing more. And you know, now I go in there regularly. And I will do hashtag searches, I'll do hashtag searches for hashtags that are relevant to my brand. So a year ago, I might have seen nothing with hashtag influencer marketing. But now I see a bunch of bloggers and content, people are talking about it. So I think that just that notion of using social for that competitive research, to understand competitors, one thing, but as far as creating that content strategy, and aligning what you do, so it doesn't look out of place. And I find that, you know, a lot of companies do social wrong, because they're they're not in the feet of their customers, because they're not using those platforms. So this is another way of really aligning what you do. And you're gonna find, you know, my 17 year old daughter, God bless her. She'll say, Daddy, you can't just put that real on tick tock, it's a different culture, we speak differently. It's different friends, right? And she'll show me a tick tock, she's interning at a company. So shoot me a tick tock she made it just oh, well, it's like this. It's like this tick tock trend. Everybody gets it? Well, I don't get it. So I'm not on it. But if I want to speak and make some, you know, traction in that world, I guess, part of this whole from my personal customer experience is this user experience. And customer experience and social media is the social media, user experience, and better understanding how users use it. Right?

Stacy Sherman:

Absolutely. I mean, this is marketing 101, where do you reach your target market? Where are they? And then we have to go there. And we have to message there, we have to service there too.

Neal Schaffer:

So Stacey, I am a well, you know, my listeners are a broad perspective of people. If they wanted to get in touch with you or hire you, what sort of services do you provide? visa vie CX for the entrepreneurs and, and businesses that are listening?

Stacy Sherman:

Yes. So I am in the trenches every day, which I believe is a differentiator for me. So by day I work in a corporate environment and by night, I am coaching and mentoring people who are at all different levels of their expertise, are novice of doing customer experience, right? So people who don't even have any concept of what is this how do you begin? I am Now crawl, walk run in. So I will ask you the right questions to make sure where are you in the crawl, walk, run and really help you get to run, because it is 100% That you will differentiate your brand, be able to get a premium price for what you do, because of the experience. And so yeah, doing CX right.com is a lot of free resources, my podcasts and blog, and my mentorship program. And I'm very passionate about it. And I would say there's one other thing that I want to make sure people are aware of when it comes to social media. One more lasting tip, because it's so easy to do. Make sure you're using social media to actually get the voice of I guess its customers, prospects, your audience, there's a way to do a poll to ask people, you can ask I mean, you'll start to see it a lot, especially on LinkedIn lately. Right? And people answer the question, and then you take that poll, that survey, and then you explode it, you use it to help your strategy, you create blog articles from it, you really amplify it. So that's easy to do.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I, I want to just let people know. So when I, when I came up with the age of influence, I did a giveaway contest. As part of the giveaway talent contest, I gave the most points to people answered the survey. And you know, I get asked to answer a lot of surveys, I never answered like, what's in it for me? What's the incentive? What's the ROI, but I wanted to I wanted to give people an incentive, and the incentive is they get more points to, you know, apply to get a better chance of winning stuff. And it was really that survey in how you construct the survey how I construct it, I wanted to know, I wanted to come up with a digital course or a digital membership. So it's asking, have you ever bought a digital course? Or are you part of a digital membership? Or how many? And it was really that insight? That let me know that wow, 50% of the people that actually took part in the giveaway at were presently or had been a member of a monthly membership. And that was to me, that was really surprising. Shocking, in some ways, and I would have never known if I didn't ask the question. And that helped me launch what is now digital first, this, you know, mastermind community that I have. So I think, you know, it's it's I'm sure, Stacy, we could do an hour interview with you on how to do this, right? But it's not just the fact of asking, but it's what you ask how you ask it, and then what you do with it, after you ask it because you can't come at it with pre assumptions. So you have but you have to be able to use what people are saying, because that's the voice of your target audience, right?

Stacy Sherman:

Correct. And customer experience. I call it there's a heart and science framework behind it. And so much of it is about feedback. And there's a lot of ways you can get feedback. And you're right, you have to right ask the right questions, you have to ask them the right wording, the right order, there's there's a science behind it. And you have to close the loop, you have to do something with it. But the point here is you're saying is that feedback is gold, whether it's from your employees, whether it's from your customers, or whether it's from strangers, get it, use it so that you're not flying blind?

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I will say my daughter is preparing her college essays. And she actually asked her friends, she came up with 30 adjectives, which are the three that best describe me. And she's using that to better frame her personality. So there's many different levels, I feel like customer experience is something that's very, it's very specific, B is very broad. And it can be applied in so many different ways. It's almost like the infrastructure that every business should have, that they should be tapping into at various points. I'm sure you could create it. So I'm hoping that, you know, there's a lot of actionable advice here. But there's also a lot of mindset advice here. And I'm hoping that my listeners understand and appreciate that. So Stacy, you mentioned your website. If you can mention that once more where people can find you name your podcast, as well as any place in social media you'd like to drive people.

Stacy Sherman:

Yes, please. Doing CX Right. Or doing the word doing CX stands for customer experience doing CX right.com. And on my website, you will find over 50 podcasts, including yours, and my blog and resources and I encourage people to connect with me join my free newsletter, and keep the customer experience movement alive. Get involved, understand it, increase your skills, and it's all connected to business success. So thank you.

Neal Schaffer:

Amen to that. Stacey, thank you so much for sharing your wisdom and your experience with all of us. I hope you'll all at a minimum because you're listening to this podcast. Go over to doing CX right subscribe to Stacy's podcasts, listen to my interview, she has a number of amazing people that she's interviewed as well that so you're, it's gonna be well worth your time. And as you can see, you know CX is this broad thing, this broad concept that can be applied in so many different ways. So I think you're gonna get a lot out of listening to those 50 or so podcasts. So Stacy, once again, thank you very much. And, you know, we've never met in person, but I have a feeling it's only a matter of time. So looking forward to that day.

Stacy Sherman:

Absolutely. Thank you.

Neal Schaffer:

All right, isn't Stacy just a gem? I really really enjoyed that interview. And hey, would you like to be interviewed on my podcast? Do you know someone? Or is there someone that you respect that you'd like me to interview? Reach out to me, Neil at Neal schaffer.com. can't make any promises. But you never know. I'm always looking for interesting people to interview and if they're already part of my audience, or part of the network of people, my audience, this is how I'm trying to improve customer experience. I'd love to hear from you. And let's get that conversation going. Neal at Neal schaffer.com. Or go to my website, Neal schaffer.com/contact. Also, if you want a little bit more hand holding with your digital marketing, why don't you join my mastermind community, we are a group of 15. Actually, as I am recording this, we are currently full one we're full capacity, there is a waiting list. And right now we have that waiting list. And I do that to be able to give all 15 members all of the attention that they deserve for being a paid member. So if that interests you go over to Neal schaffer.com/membership. If there is an opening then you'll see a Join Now button. If there's not there will be a waiting list that you can join and I'll let you know as soon as there is an opening. Alrighty, well, that's it for a another episode of the digital marketing coach podcast. As always, I want to remind you to keep your eye on the goal. This is your digital marketing coach Neal Schaffer signing off. You've been listening to your digital marketing coach, questions, comments, requests, links, go to podcast dot Neal schaffer.com. Get the show notes to this and 200 plus podcast episodes, and Neal schaffer.com to tap into the 400 Plus blog posts that Neil has published to support your business. While you're there, check out Neil's Digital First group coaching membership community if you or your business needs a little helping hand. See you next time on your digital marketing coach.