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April 29, 2021

208: 5 Creative Ways to Set Up Your B2B Sales Team for Success [Pam Didner Interview]

208: 5 Creative Ways to Set Up Your B2B Sales Team for Success [Pam Didner Interview]

For B2B brands, your internal influencers are often your salespeople. They are facing your customer and often are the most active on social media because they can monetize their influence in the form of additional commissions.

That's why every employee influencer / advocacy program for B2B brands becomes successful when there is alignment between sales and marketing.

If this is a need your company has, you are in for a special treat. B2B marketing thought leader and best-selling author Pam Didner joins us today to give us some creative ways to set up your B2B sales team for success, including:

  • Identify how you can help sales via different sales stages
  • Map marketing content to a sales cycle
  • Understand the collaboration process between sales and marketing

Key Highlights

[01:02] Introduction of podcast guest, Pam Didner
[04:44] Pam Didner's Book
[4:57] What is Sales Enablement?
[7:08] Different Sales Stages
[10:30] Best Content Strategy Practice
[13:07] The Importance of Building Relationship With Your Sales People
[16:03] Ways to Collaborate and Work With Sales Team
[19:04] The Critical Role of Quality Data
[21:08] Leveraging Tools and Processes In Sales and Marketing Alignment
[26:08] The Role of AIs
[30:16] Basic Questions You Should Ask Your Vendor
[31:06] Connect with Pam
[31:39] Final Conclusion

Notable Quotes:

  • In addition, to build brain awareness and drive demands, a portion of our job is also supporting sales. And the one major functions of doing that is to provide content that salespeople can use. So not just educating themselves, they can also use it to share with your clients or the prospect.
  • Salespeople are very relationship-driven. And that's how to they build their accounts, or do the customer is a lot to do with relationship. It's still very much a relationship-based type of approach when you want to close any kind of sales.
  • Find a way to provide value and then build that relationship over a period of time. What I have come to realize is that supporting sales is very similar to why salespeople try to build a relationship with the prospects and the potential customers, you need to take a similar approach to build that relationship with your salespeople.
  • In every single marketing element that you have in your sleeves, if you apply on the sales side and be very targeted and accounts specific, it's basically sales enablement to some extent.
  • Technology often gets over and the process gets overlooked. And the technology does not create the process, you need to have the process. And then find the technology that helps enable it right.

Pam Didner Links

Neal Schaffer Links

Transcript

Neal Schaffer:

Do you work in a b2b organization where your sales people are the influencers? If you're trying to figure out how to make the influence that salespeople have, how to make that work for your marketing, this episode of The maximize your social influence episode will be the perfect remedy for the medicine that you are seeking. Welcome to the maximize your social influence podcast with Neal Schaffer, where I help marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners grow their businesses using innovative marketing techniques, leveraging the concept of digital influence throughout digital and social media. Hey, everybody, Neal Schaffer here. Welcome to episode number 208. That's right 208 of the maximize your social influence podcast. Today we have a very special guest someone who is keynoting content marketing world this year. She is well known as a thought leader in the content marketing space. She is the author of not one, not two, but three books about content marketing, the modern AI marketer, global content marketing, and most recently and most relevant for this episode, effective sales enablement. Now, if you work in a sales organization, or I should say a b2b organization, you might have heard me speak before, about when we look at employee influencers in b2b organizations, the salespeople are the influencers, they can monetize their influence, they're not Kim Kardashians, yet, if they're out there in social media, and people are consuming their content and they're building like no one trust that inevitably will result in more sales, and therefore more commissions. That's the ROI of their influencer marketing. So if you are you a business leader, or you work in marketing, and you're trying to figure out how do I leverage the influence that our b2b sales team has, especially because they are customer facing? Well, this episode is with none other than Pam dibner, the author of those three books, as I said, content marketing, b2b, marketing, thought leader, and she is here today to give us five creative ways to set up our b2b sales team for success. Now, perhaps you're not in a b2b organization, I would urge you to still listen too long because the concept of leveraging your internal employees and aligning your content with them and collaborating with them is a hallmark of an employee influencer program. This is how it will be applied to b2b. But there is an equal way to apply the BTC you're just gonna have to do a little bit more creative soul searching to find out how to do that. But hey, that's enough for me. Without further ado, here's my interview with Pam diviner, author of effective sales enablement. Hey, everybody, welcome to another episode of The maximize your social influence podcast today, we have a very special guest, who is going to be talking to us about b2b sales. Now, this podcast talks about influence. And while it's primarily geared towards marketers, if you remember the podcast interview I had with Chris Stewart, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway homeservices, you'll know that there are many salespeople, like real estate agents that are also they need to be marketers as well, right? Or entrepreneurs that need to be both sales and marketers. So I think it's really relevant if you work in a b2b company. There's a lot of alignment that needs to take place between sales and marketing. I know Pam is going to cover for us in this interview. So Pam, welcome to the maximizing social influence podcast. Neil, thank you so much for having me on. No, thank you so much for coming. Pam, you've been one of the thought leaders in marketing for some time, I know that you have you have a new book coming out to you. You recently published a new book or am I mistaken you with someone else?

Pam Didner:

No, I don't have a new book coming out. Unfortunately, I wish I do. And but I did publish a little ebook and the AI modern marketer will be talking about the artificial intelligence, it's ramification in the overall b2b marketing landscape. So that's a little ebook on Amazon.

Neal Schaffer:

Awesome. And once again, in order to find that Pam dibner di D ner. You'll also find her book global content marketing, I believe,

Pam Didner:

yeah, I have two books. One is global content marketing, how to scale content across regions. And another way is effective sales enablement, which is our key topic, how to support sales and able sales as a marketer.

Neal Schaffer:

So sales enablement is a funny word that I suppose if you work in I remember my background for those that know me is b2b sales. And we all of a sudden had this inside sales department. I'm like, What is inside sales? outside and, and so in a similar way, sales enablement as another one is buzzwords that over time has begun to live in organizations. Can you please sort of first let's start with the definition of what that is?

Pam Didner:

Yeah. So sales enablement, is really coming from in the back I was in early 80s. And that a lot of companies start selling technologies and foremost was IBM. So IBM was selling the mainframe computer before they move into the PC. And the computers, or any kind of technology related product requires a lot of explaining, like somebody for someone who has no experience in the technical background, or understand what computer will do, you need to explain what that is. So the salespeople at IBM, somehow they need to be educated in terms of what the products wore, and how they should talk about the products. So in the past, we before that when you sell anything, you literally just basically show the products do a lot of show and tell and people can sell the product. But and once the technology came along, you cannot do that anymore. because technology is a whole lot more sophisticated and complicated. You need to educate people, for them to understand what that is. Therefore, you need to enable salespeople. So for long time, the sales enablement or definition of sales enablement is really about onboarding and training other sales professionals. But over a period of time, what I have noticed is for b2b marketers like you and me, job in addition to build a brain wareness and drive, drive demands, a portion of our job is also supporting sales. And the one major functions of doing that is provide content that salespeople can use. So not just educating themselves, they can also use it to share with your clients or the prospect.

Neal Schaffer:

Gotcha. Yeah, makes a lot of sense. And I think we're going to talk more about that sort of how enablement is sort of aligned with alignment between sales and marketing. But let's first start with how you can help sales via different sales stages. So I'm assuming this comes as part of the sales enablement program. But it's filled with with content in the background as well, I'm assuming as well,

Pam Didner:

correct, choo, choo, choo. So I love that you brought up sales stages for marketers, we tend to think about buyers journeys, right. So when we create content, we kind of map out content to different sales, the buyers journey from the time they become aware of our products, and then start doing research and then start you kind of move them down to the channels and the purchase channel, if you will. So marketers tend to think about buyers journey. But when you talk to salespeople, they will like, Huh, is really about how I'm going to sell. So Neil, you bought a very good point. It's a sales stages. So from sales perspective, they were like, Okay, I have a prospect, I need to qualify the person, once I start qualifying them, I probably need to start having conversation with them. Once I have a conversation with them, they might be showing interest, they want to see a demo, if they see a demo, then we probably can can move on to the proposal stage. And then we close the deal. Granted, the sales stages is not that linear. But from sales perspective, they usually follow like four or five sales stages. Right? So they prospect, they qualify, they do demo, and they send out a proposal, and they close the deal. So the sales people think from that perspective, if you are supporting sales, you need to map the content at a minimal level to sales stages in order to have a conversation with them.

Neal Schaffer:

And therefore, marketers are probably always thinking about the buyers journey, I know. But they they're not necessarily mapping out the content to each of the stages. So those that have never heard about our company, and then when they get into the next stage of the journey, what does that look like? And I'm assuming over time, you get more technical. Over time, there's also going to be some competitive pieces of how you compare and the whole pair and that also gives you sort of a roadmap for the content that you need to create. Right?

Pam Didner:

Right. So you bought a very good point meal. I mean, a lot of time we have editorial especially in the content marketing, we have editorial planning, we actually have a different content pieces that we will create with different personas, also different buyers journey. And I'm not saying that all the content we're creating the marketing applies to the sales 100% but there are certain pieces that certainly can apply into a sales stages your product overview can apply to marketing can also apply to sales. additive guy can apply to marketing can apply to sales. Some of the content that you created a white paper is more thought leadership driven. That can also be a conversational opener for your salespeople. Especially in during the stage between say you're qualifying them and also doing the demo. You want to get them to interest In your product, you can start to use certain pieces of content marketing create, to keep driving that conversation, and the moving your prospect to a different level the next stage.

Neal Schaffer:

So I guess the first thing to point out is, if you're in marketing, be aware of the buyers journey, and of specifically making content for that. But is there a part of this? And maybe you're gonna get to this a little bit later in the interview, where you actually want to come together with your sales people, and have your content strategy for the buyers journey informed by them? Is that a best practice these days? Or how far?

Pam Didner:

That really depends? Neil, you brought a very good point, there are many ways to work with sales, especially I tried to understand what kind of content they need. And your suggestion in terms of having conversation with sales and understand the needs, incorporate that into part of your content planning. I think that's right. That's definitely a very ideal ways of doing it. However, I have come to realize a lot of times salespeople are very busy, they are not necessarily want to talk to you. Yeah. And they just basically, they want whatever content you have, can you just show with me, I can give you some feedback in terms of Will this apply to me. But a lot of times, if you want salespeople to think and brainstorm with you and give you information, not every salesperson like that, they kind of want to be fed. So then you have to do kind of like a trial and error type of approach, and show them the content and also explain to them why you show them specific type of content. And the best way to show them that content is mapped into a sales stages. But I do agree with you, if you can get your sales people's feedback in advance, that will help tremendously. If nothing else tried to understand what kind of content pieces of news in the past that also help. Or if you have a content management library, especially on the sales side, you can go to the content management library or sales enablement platform to see what kind of content that tend to be downloaded the most by the salespeople. That will also give you a clue in terms of why you need to support them.

Neal Schaffer:

I know you've obviously worked with a lot of companies in your career, and what have you, have you seen innovative ways, unique ways in which marketers have been able to get the sort of information out of salespeople? You know, I've heard of like, you know, Bing does hell. I've heard a lunch and learns. And here's a Google Voice number, you know, call this number, if you have any thoughts, or I mean, any?

Pam Didner:

Yeah, in general, I have to say working with sales tend to be you know, salespeople are very relationship driven. And that's how to they build their accounts, or do customer is a lot to do with relationship. And I don't think that's been taken away, even in the virtual communication. They still very much relationship based type of approach, when you want to close any kind of sales. I mean, how many times Neal, you and I, we get clients from referrals. That's because we have the relationship with our existing customers, we did a pretty good job and they say, Hey, you know, what, if you want to do influencer marketing, talk to Neal Schaffer, right? So it's coming from that. So it's still very much relationship based type of approach come down to sales. And my recommendation for marketers to build that relationship is you have to think you have to be you have to do a long play. If you you cannot just like okay, I want sales. I want to, I want to know what you want. And then I have the one off communication with you. Is it possible that you can attend the sales huddle meeting? Is it possible that you from time to time you send the information that you think that might be helpful to them? Is it possible that you have some information that helped their specific accounts, so find a way to provide value and then build that relationship over a period of time, what have come to realize the supporting sales is very similar to why sales people try to build a relationship with the prospects and the potential customers, you need to take a similar approach to build that relationship with your with your sales people. I can tell you, if you are just starting doing that you have no relationship with any sales reps, and you want to stop a building that some sales reps, my welcome that the many salespeople couldn't care less, right? Because whatever you do is not going to help them in terms of like for them to me the quarter of the month. Does that make sense? They will come talk to you when they need something. But if they don't need anything, they don't want to talk to you. That's kind of reality. I hate saying that. So over a period of time, you kind of need to find out what they want and appeal and provide value over time to build that relationship. It's a long play. There's no shortcut. Neil, as much as I want to share with everybody was the easy way you can build a relationship with your salespeople. You know what? There's no shortcut. It's a relationship approach. Yeah.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah. That's, that's awesome. Pam. And it really speaks to a lot of what I talked about with influencer marketing and I think what we discussed in your podcast and you know, when we look at it from from a b2b perspective, you know, I talked about influencer marketing being you know, there's there's influence all around us. It's not just it's Not just bloggers, it's your customers, it's your partners, and many times it's your employees. And in a b2b organization, your biggest influencers are probably your sales people. And they're the ones who can monetize their influence by getting more sales, right and getting bigger bonuses. So Exactly. So when you think about it that way, the same reason why you need to build relationships with influencers outside of your company, you need to take the same approach inside. And if you're b2b, specifically with those salespeople and find different ways to incentivize them free social media training, free photoshoots, whatever it is, but there you go, it's all based on that relationship.

Pam Didner:

You hit the core, you hit the core.

Neal Schaffer:

Awesome. So we've we've sort of identified these different sales stages. And we're beginning to map our marketing content now to not just the different stages, but just sort of the the sales cycle, right? We've already sort of talked about different ways in which we can take that forward, in what other ways can we collaborate and really align what we're doing with sales so that we get the biggest impact for our marketing budget,

Pam Didner:

you know, there are so many ways to actually collaborate and work with sales team. And I always feel that whatever marketing channels or marketing campaigns that you are doing, and any kind of marketing tricks that you have, you can actually apply supporting sales. And let me give you a couple examples. If you actually do say email marketing, right, and you run a lot of email marketing campaigns, what how do you translate that or convert that to supporting sales? What about you run account based email marketing campaigns, right, so you identify probably 200 accounts in Salesforce or the acei CRM database, and that people have not is on the contact database that have not talked to us actually, for a long period of time. But at this, but six months ago, they show some sort of some sort of interest. And you can run account based or account specific winback email marketing, be very specific in terms of content that you choose, be very specific about the email marketing that you wrote in terms of your copy, and see if you can get additional leads for your sales people. And another thing is if you do email marketing, and I know a lot of people do event marketing, and they do industry events, sponsorship, they also do you know, customer events of if the company is big enough, they actually have an annual customer event. But you can also do account specific type of event for a top account. For example, if you have two or three strategic account, and they brought probably 30% of revenue for your companies, you can run a very nice tailored customized events for them. Does that make sense? And if you do retargeting ads, same thing, is it possible that you can take a look at your CRM database and see what are the potential prospects or leads that actually show express in or express and show some sort of interest in the past? You run retargeting ads to them, of course, you have to clean up the database first to make sure you are the quality of your the lead information is current. So what I'm trying to say is, in every single marketing elements that you have in your sleeves, if you apply on the sales side and be very targeted and accounts specific, it's basically sales enablement to some extent, does that make sense? Neal?

Neal Schaffer:

It does. And, you know, I've always thought that account based marketing is marketers thinking like salespeople, they can't sell the same way to every organization, because every organization's needs are different. But if they can have their marketing team, you know, have the whole digital properties and content customized for each one of their clients. I mean, that's amazing. And and therefore, I think what you what you just said, makes a tremendous amount of sense. And I would argue that every marketer should be doing that, they should have been doing that, for some time, the technology enables the pun intended, enables them to do it a lot easier than they could have 10 or 20 years ago, right would have been, would have cost a lot more money to create specific PDF, not even PDFs, but like pamphlets and written content. But these days, it's easy to do digitally. So I think that's great advice.

Pam Didner:

The only drawback or something that people tend to overlook. I do agree with you, Neil. Also, it's like if you are using those tools, if you are using your marketing channels already, why don't you just expand that amplify on the sales side. But a lot of time, you still need to look at the back end, make sure that your tool can support that. Make sure that your CRM is talking to your marketing automation tool, make sure that the quality of the data is current. And we always have a quality adopt for our customer database. There's always data decay every three or four months, like people moving around to change their job. So there's a data decay, how to maintain the certain quality and the current of your database is very critical. That plays a huge role in terms of how you can better support sales team.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, no, absolutely. So

Pam Didner:

data cleaning is such a boring job. Nobody wants to do it is mundane, and nobody can take credit that such a such a job that is so critical, but not getting enough credit.

Neal Schaffer:

No, it's true. And the engagement of your list will impact deliverability. And I mean, yeah, as you can imagine only a great total. Yeah, yeah. No, it's so funny. So when we think about sales and marketing alignment, it's like, oh, can't we just get along together. But there's so many things, as you've talked about, that marketers from a sales centric perspective, can really do, and it's going to help their marketing, right. And it's funny because we have these employee advocacy programs. And this is really where sort of internal influencer marketing started, and a lot of them fail. But if you really gear all your marketing activities towards sales, as you've recommended, they become natural advocates, because you've, you've equipped them with the tools they need to be successful. And maybe that's that's the way to think about advocacy is give them what they need. Like, if you want to develop relationships with influencers, WI I FM what's in it for me, what's in it for the salespeople. And I think that more hopefully, a lot of marketers are listening what you say, and and really rethink how they operate. And, you know, better align themselves with the needs of their sales department.

Pam Didner:

Yeah. So in addition to sales, the sales and marketing alignment, in terms of understand what your needs are, I think the factor or layer of complexity in terms of sales and marketing alignment is a policies, you need to make sure you have a process in place. And also even you guys, even the sales and marketing collaborate, you make sure that you have a tool to support it. Nowadays, you cannot do anything manually anymore, even though we still export our database into Excel file, even though we still use a pivot table. But in general, they are always tool for there's always an app or something, everybody is always always using certain kinds of platform and certain kinds of tools to pull information to, to look into analytics, you need to make sure you have a process and tools in place to support that to in order to move your collaboration forward. And I feel that the processes and the tools tend to be overlooked when people talking about, you know, alignments between two different divisions or two different groups. And from my perspective, that's super critical.

Neal Schaffer:

So what are you talking about things like slack are something more complex,

Pam Didner:

so gray point, you want to be very concrete, for example, if I want to do a lead routing, let's just be very specific, you know, you have to route the leads from marketing side to a sales side, right. So when you do an outbound marketing, and you actually have a lead coming into your website, and that the fill out the form, okay, so if you're the form, you have that person's information, you have that email, and you also have the first name and last name. So that information needs to be somehow automatically uploaded or being integrated into the marketing automation tool, right. But that person also expressed interest, they want to talk to a salesperson, therefore, that person needs to be routed to a specific salesperson to carry that conversation, then, if that person needs to be moved the data flow now think about data flow, that person needs to be moved into a place that the inside sales person I know you joke about inside and outside sales inside sales person to routed to the right person to talk to there's a tool that needs to be set up. So there's a connection that needs to happen between a marketing automation tool and to know the whatever routing tool that you are using, it can be ci M. Does that make sense? So right? Listen, the connection needs to be set up the process need to set up in order to make that routing happen to assign to a specific salesperson, once that's a sign, obviously a lot of conversation that will happen, we somehow need to track it to make sure that whatever happened to that lead, it's either do one or the last. And with that being said, then you can determine you can if you can track that clearly from the from the lead that's been generated and engage with us on the website until the deal closes and deal. One, then you can kind of see what is the marketing's impact overall for the sale stages, then Is that helpful? Yeah, no, a lot of time. The problem is what I have noticed myself included, like the process tend to be fragmented. That means there are certain points, there's always a manual transfer. Or there are certain points, that data is not tracked. And therefore it's actually very hard to understand what is the impact of that specifically, if you will?

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I mean, I just remember back in the day, I've been in sales. Oh, we had an exhibition, a convention, hey, you know, and marketing's like, Hey, we sent you 2000 business cards, and it's like, but are they running? Okay? Yeah, yeah, were they relevant or not? is one and then like, were they tracked? And it's like, you know, marketing is like, well, we already gave sales all these leads. And then sales is like we

Pam Didner:

agree, what you just said is what I'm trying to emphasize the process and tools needs to be connected. Yeah.

Neal Schaffer:

And the thing is, the tools are there to be connected. So there's a lot of CRM tools that have marketing automation, have web forms. So if you if you architected and you don't need to be a huge enterprise to invest in these tools either, so if you architected the right way, and you're tagging people, and you're automating that once someone is tagged, it goes inside sales and account person is assigned. And so the technology is there, even for very, very small businesses. It's just are they are they doing it or not? And you're right, that technology often I think gets over and the process gets overlooked. And, and the technology does not create the process, you need to have the process, and then find the technology that helps enable it right. I think a lot of companies go the other way. Yeah. And they end up with you. I've had clients that bought like, you know, very small businesses started about HubSpot. They were using just the email functionality. It's like, let's move you over to something else. You know, you don't need all this right now. When you're bigger. You might but but yeah, it's very interesting how people invest in the technology without defining the process. I'm curious because you wrote the book on AI, there. Is there any role that AI you see playing in, in the sales marketing relationship? Or anything that we talked about? Or? Or is your ebook on a completely different subject?

Pam Didner:

Oh, now, there's AI is gonna play a huge role in everything we do. I mean, even on the commercial side, or even our daily lives, right at Google. Like, for example, we do Google search, we just type keywords, and Google will try to anticipate what we want to write. That's the algorithm or artificial intelligence in work, right? When we talk to our Alexa, we talk to our Siri, that's artificial intelligence and work, we use ways and to drive to find the fastest and the most shortest route to wherever we want to go. That's artificial intelligence in work. So the bottom line is AI is embedded into our lives, even though we don't see it. And so the algorithm is going to play a huge role on the sales and marketing site as well, just like you said, Neil, like you have 2000 leads, like you collected during the event. And is it possible, and I'm just saying out loud, that AI can pull based on that business card with the name of the company, the address of the company, the person? Can the AI pull a lot of social profile information directly from the web, and try to identify Is that the right qualified lead to me your ideal customer profile ICP? Right? artificial intelligence can do that. But if we, as a manual person need to do that kind of job, it's going to take us forever, or we kind of just like resign was like, you know, like, I'm not gonna do this. Just I'm gonna resign, right? Because it's a very mundane work. Yeah, so a lot of the tasks, especially repetitive tasks, that can be done by AI, but the problem is AI is machine learning. And so you have to train your machine to think and to learn a certain way, just like the image recognition, right? When they see like 1000s of Neal Schaffer, his images, like from the time you were Lillo, until the time you are now they probably can recognize your faces moving forward when you upload your photos into the apple photo library. So but the same thing that that same analogy apply, if you want to use AI in sales and marketing application, there's likely you will need to spend some time to train the artificial intelligence to think certain way. And that takes a lot of time to make things happen. Does that make sense? So a lot of time, people will feel like, oh, artificial intelligence I can implement and then things will go hunky dory. No, it doesn't. There's a time that you have to make sure that you train the machines, the time that you need to help the machine learn. Therefore, it's kind of like training a little kids, right? It's a potty training, you train the kids to potty training eventually was okay can go to a bathroom by himself or herself. That same thing need to apply to artificial intelligence. I think moving forward initially, what all of us will be using artificial intelligence through a third party platform, then over a period of time, you can actually hire like a data analysts or AI experts to actually build your models to look at your massive value of a customer database to do additional analysis. But yes, the sky is limit come down to artificial intelligence applications in sales and marketing.

Neal Schaffer:

I've always thought that AI is sort of a godsend, because we can train it to do those mundane tasks. Yeah. And to free us up that we can, you know, do greater and greater analysis, because the data has already been crunched. But you bring up an important point, the AI is only good. It's garbage in garbage out. Yeah,

Pam Didner:

I want you back to data. Again, it comes back to data.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah. And it's funny because as a user of technology, I've always thought, Well, you know, whatever tool companies out there, you have all the data, why don't you deliver me insights, I don't want to see like average, you know, retweets per tweet, I want you to go in and find the keywords of the 10 most retweeted tweets. And tell me, you know, and these are things that I remember going to marchetto Nation when it was still marchetto, like four or five years ago, and they were already introducing in their analytics, some components of AI. Yep. Right. And so I do agree with you, we're gonna hopefully if companies are listening, they're going to be including a lot more of this in the beginning. analysis. I've also seen some really, really interesting plays with AI in AI and natural language processing. Yeah, or SEO for content. And we've seen a few startups come out with voice

Pam Didner:

recognition, voice search, and that's going to be a big deal moving forward. Yeah, I hear you.

Neal Schaffer:

So I guess if for those out there listening, if you are looking for technology, really be asking your vendor, what are they doing visa? The AI? Right? Yeah. Is it on the roadmap, what what are their plans?

Pam Didner:

And also how you can use them? And what they can do to actually help you? So yeah, those are found? Those are basic questions, and you should check and also with your vendors, no, or if you source a new platforms.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, no, it makes a lot of sense. Well, thank you for answering those AI related questions. I didn't realize the conversation. No, but since since you've, you've obviously have a very broad you know, expertise, from global marketing to b2b content marketing to everything. We talked about b2b sales now AI, so thank you so much for you know, offering your, your expertise and listeners, where can people go to find out more about you? And you know, what's next on your roadmap?

Pam Didner:

Oh, very good. If anybody like to reach out to me for any b2b marketing related questions that you just send me your questions on any social media channels except Tick Tock. But reach out to me on any social media platform or Hello at Hampton comm or just go to my website, Pam lynda.com. Love, love, love to hear from you. If you have any questions, love to help

Neal Schaffer:

and search for her books on Amazon. Once again, Pam, dinner, p am di di n er. Well, thank you very much, Pam. Good luck with everything. And we'll hopefully talk to you again in the near future.

Pam Didner:

Sounds great. It was wonderful talking to you.

Neal Schaffer:

All right. I hope you enjoyed that interview with Pam. You know, my background, before social media was b2b sales biz dev and marketing. So I love talking b2b. To many marketers b2c, it's just a lot more intuitive. What I do with b2b, I think that sales enablement is really one of these missing pieces, that as marketers, if we want to leverage the resources that we have around us, we've got to get our salespeople involved. And there's tremendous ROI for everyone when we do that, but it's not in hey, here's some leads, why haven't you converted them? It's really breaking down the silos and aligning ourselves with them, and trying to figure out the best way forward, especially especially as it relates to content. If content is important to being in b2c worlds, man, it's only more important in b2b. So figuring that out, is gold. I want to thank you again, for listening to the end. I always like to give shout outs to the people, the listeners in those countries where this podcast is ranking it as a top podcast in marketing channels. So Bella Reuss, man, this was actually ranking as the top podcasts in business for a while I want to thank you all Finland, Argentina, Portugal, India, India, sending prayers your way. Because of this, this nasty Coronavirus, and just the news reports that I'm hearing South Africa, New Zealand, Denmark, Mexico, Spain, Germany, my friends up north and Canada. And of course, all of my friends here in my native United States of America. Thank you all. I appreciate all the reviews that come in on the various platforms, if you haven't had a chance to review, and you feel like just saying a few things of whatever value you got out of this, and put it up there and really mean a lot to me. And it really helps in exposing this podcast to other people. Finally, since you've listened this long, if you're interested in my community, which I launched on April 1, it is going really well. You probably heard my adverts. My pre roll adverts before previous episodes on it, but you can go to Neal Schaffer tocom slash membership. To find out more information podcasting is actually a huge topic that we're talking about, and helping people launch podcasts, as well as become guests on other podcasts. So it's not limited to podcasting. But there seems to be a definite interest in that. And as a community, we are helping each other achieve great results in that part of digital marketing. So hey, that's it for another episode. Wherever you are in the world, make it a great virtual social day. Bye Bye everybody. And SEO nada